All posts by rayyeo2

4th Annual Mindfulness Fair March 23

The Fourth Annual Mindfulness Fair, sponsored by the Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, will be held on Saturday, March 23, 2019 at the Falk Laboratory School on the Pitt campus. Doors open for this free, all-ages event at 9:30a.m. and it runs through 4p.m. The theme this year is  “Mindfulness in Our Community: Listening, Learning, Helping.”

This year we will explore ways in which mindfulness – the conscious awareness of the moment- can help our community heal, find peace, and move us into action to make positive change.  Keynote speaker, Michelle King, fellow love activist, social change facilitator, and innovative mindfulness educator will be featured, along with breakout sessions, mindful movement activities, “all ages” activities, and a special panel of mindful action first responders who set the pace for positive change in our city after the events last year.

Our meditation room will feature a variety of meditation techniques led by local practitioners. Information tables highlighting the work of regional non-profit and campus organizations will also be available throughout the day.

Light refreshments and snacks will be available throughout the day.

We invite the greater Pittsburgh community to gather together to mindfully listen and learn from each other as we all find ways to help bring peace, healing, and change for all.

Download the 4th Mindfulness Fair program for a speaker listing and schedule.

For more information, and to register, go to our Eventbright page.

 

 

Mindfulness for Educators on February 19th

Please join us at Falk School for an evening focusing on self-compassion for educators.  As a group we will discuss empathy, compassion and wellness and supplement the discussion with practice, as always.  This session we will be joined by regional mindfulness expert and director of the Building Compassionate Learning Communities Project, Tina Raspanti.

Tina is lifelong learner and has 27 years in the education field. Tina is currently at Mt. Lebanon School district where she teaches psychology. She earned a Certificate in Positive Psychology from the Flourishing Center, has engaged in coursework, and holds several certifications related to mindfulness, compassion, and social emotional learning programming for both students and teachers.

Date: 02/19/2019 (Tue.)
Time: 6:30pm – 7:30pm EST

Sign up here.  Or contact Leah (lcn6@pitt.edu) with any questions!

Mindfulness for Educators event January 22nd

The University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies and the Pittsburgh Alliance for University Schools are hosting a Mindfulness for Educators evening.  This group brings together Pittsburgh area teachers who are practicing mindfulness, who are hoping to practice or who would like to introduce mindfulness to their students.

The event will take place Tuesday, January 22nd from 6:30 – 7:30 pm at Falk School and will include a group practice, a chance to share, and professional resources.  Sign up now!

Women in Medicine and Science Forum fosters inspiration, empowerment in workplace

From Pitt News

Research has shown that happier employees are less stressed, more productive and altruistic, and better at leading teams and solving problems.

Tanner LeBaron Wallace, associate professor in the School of Education and center associate at the Learning Research and Development Center, recalled having been chosen ‘most likely to succeed,’ but yet feeling lonely and misunderstood.

But what does this mean in tangible terms? And what steps and simple activities can be incorporated into already-busy schedules without adding to — or getting in the way of — our actual work?

These questions were among those discussed on Nov. 28 and 29 at the Office of Academic Career Development Health Sciences’ annual Women in Medicine and Science Forum. Nearly 200 registrants — mostly but not exclusively women — attended each of the sessions held at the University Club over the two-day event.

Building on the success and momentum of last year’s Year of Healthy U initiatives, the forum focused on the academic research and scientific findings related to wellness, including using mindfulness meditation to reduce stress, practicing breathing exercises to enhance rest and refining communication styles to better suit audiences.

Read the full article.

Center for Mindfulness helps sponsor inaugural conference: Building Compassionate Learning Communities

Please join us to build, grow, and support compassionate and resilient learning communities at the inaugural conference of Building Compassionate Learning Communities (BCLC).

Thanks to the generosity of the Grable Foundation and with support from the University of Pittsburgh Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies, we are excited to bring educators together with the best teachers, researchers, and practitioners in the fields of social emotional learning (SEL) and contemplative practices – mindfulness, resilience, and the science of human flourishing.

W H E N & WHERE?

Monday, October 8, 2018 – Mt. Lebanon High School, Pittsburgh, PA (8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.)

W H O ?

We welcome all stakeholders from Pre-K through Higher-Ed, including school counselors, health professionals, principals, administrators and other school leaders, superintendents and assistant superintendents, professors, pre-service teachers, and Intermediate Unit leaders. (Act 48 credits will be offered.)

W H A T ?

A day filled with learning, connection, and practice as we explore how we collectively can Build Compassionate Learning Communities through social emotional learning, mindfulness, and resilience. The conference will begin with an expert panel of Keynote Speakers, including:

  • Dr. Mark Greenberg, Bennett Endowed Chair in Prevention Research in Penn State’s College of Health and Human Development and Founding Director of the Prevention Research Center for the Promotion of Human Development, Emeritus Board Member of the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL).
  • Dr. Robert Roeser, Bennett Pierce Professor of Care, Compassion and Human Development at Penn State University, Fulbright Scholar, and Senior Program Coordinator for the Mind and Life Institute.
  • Dr. Brian Galla, Assistant Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology in the School of Education at the University of Pittsburgh. (Please see our website for more information on our Keynote Speakers.)

After lunch we will have a series of concurrent breakout sessions from a variety of organizations. The cost of registration includes breakfast, lunch and ACT48 credits. Tickets begin at $30, register now to take advantage of pre-sale and/or early bird pricing.

We have a wonderful, dedicated team working on the conference to provide you an exciting day filled with learning and practice. We look forward to having you join us and deepen our understanding of SEL and mindfulness; together we can foster compassionate learning communities!

Kind regards,

Tina Raspanti, Chair Conference Team Stephanie Confer, Jessica Peconi-Cook, Natasha Dirda, Roddy Gibbs, Michelle King, and Leah Northrop

Find out more at https://www.bclctogether.org/

Mindful Practices: A Workshop for Educators

Falk Laboratory School and the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Pittsburgh would like to invite you to an afternoon workshop!

If you are a teacher, an educator or work in a classroom setting, please consider joining Carla Tantillo Philibert from Mindful Practices for an afternoon focused on bringing Social and Emotional Learning to your classroom through mindful practices.

Carla Tantillo Philibert, the Founder of Mindful Practices, conducts Professional Development workshops across the globe. Carla is the author of Cooling Down Your Classroom and the Everyday SEL series on Routledge, which provides practical Social-Emotional Learning and Mindfulness solutions for Early Childhood to High School teachers. She is a highly sought-after speaker who provides keynote addresses globally from Texas to Michigan and Mexico to India.

The workshop will take place on June 11th from 4-6:30pm. Light refreshments will be served.  Registration is free but limited.  Please register here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mindful-practices-a-workshop-for-educators-tickets-46371198503

If you are have questions, please contact Leah Northrop at lcn6@pitt.edu.

Researchers study how mindfulness changes the brain in depressed patients

From the Harvard Gazette

In 2015, 16.1 million Americans reported experiencing major depression during the previous year, often struggling to function while grappling with crippling darkness and despair.

There’s an arsenal of treatments at hand, including talk therapy and antidepressant medications, but what’s depressing in itself is that they don’t work for every patient.

“Many people don’t respond to the frontline interventions,” said Benjamin Shapero, an instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a psychologist at Massachusetts General Hospital’s (MGH) Depression Clinical and Research Program. “Individual cognitive behavioral therapy is helpful for many people; antidepressant medications help many people. But it’s also the case that many people don’t benefit from them as well. There’s a great need for alternative approaches.”

Shapero is working with Gaëlle Desbordes, an instructor in radiology at HMS and a neuroscientist at MGH’s Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, to explore one alternative approach: mindfulness-based meditation.

In recent decades, public interest in mindfulness meditation has soared. Paralleling, and perhaps feeding, the growing popular acceptance has been rising scientific attention. The number of randomized controlled trials — the gold standard for clinical study — involving mindfulness has jumped from one in the period from 1995‒1997 to 11 from 2004‒2006, to a whopping 216 from 2013‒2015, according to a recent article summarizing scientific findings on the subject.

Studies have shown benefits against an array of conditions both physical and mental, including irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, psoriasis, anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. But some of those findings have been called into question because studies had small sample sizes or problematic experimental designs. Still, there are a handful of key areas — including depression, chronic pain, and anxiety — in which well-designed, well-run studies have shown benefits for patients engaging in a mindfulness meditation program, with effects similar to other existing treatments.

“There are a few applications where the evidence is believable. But the effects are by no means earth-shattering,” Desbordes said. “We’re talking about moderate effect size, on par with other treatments, not better. And then there’s a bunch of other things under study with preliminary evidence that is encouraging but by no means conclusive. I think that’s where it’s at. I’m not sure that is exactly how the public understands it at this point.”

Read the full article.

Call for Proposals: Religion, Technology, and Human Relationships

The Institute of Buddhist Studies, with the support of the Henry Luce Foundation, invites proposals from scholars across the academic disciplines specializing in any religious traditions, and from theologians from all religious traditions, to participate in a three-year research initiative and series of meetings addressing the impacts of technologies on human relationships.

This program seeks to identify and cultivate new models of public theology (broadly construed) that powerfully address a central concern of contemporary life: The ways in which technologies reshape human relationships and alter how people are or are not “present” to each other.

Thirteen scholars of religion and theologians will receive grants of $10,000 each to support individual research projects on technologies and interpersonal presence. Grantees will gather yearly to share and hone their research and its applications, explore opportunities for collaboration, and take advantage of significant Silicon Valley and media resources.

The detailed request for proposals is available here.

The deadline for the submission of proposals is May 7, 2018.

Address questions about the program or the application process to Program Director Dr. Steven Barrie-Anthony: stevenba@shin-ibs.edu, (510) 500-9722.